Mauritane 8.5" Salt Lamp is not only visually stunning but provide innumerable health benefits. It is natural negative ion generators. Simply put, salt attracts moisture. The interaction of humid air with the surface of the salt crystal releases negative ions. The negative ions bind to the position ions that are created by electronic devices known as "electronic smog" (computers, television screens, telephones, microwaves, etc.). The positively charged ions lose their damaging characteristics...
Himalayan salt lamps purify the air through hygroscopy. The salt lamp attracts water from surrounding areas and absorbs the water vapor molecules along with any particles that those molecules may be carrying. The light inside of the lamp helps the salt to warm up, making that water evaporate back into the air while the unwanted, foreign particles stay trapped inside the salt. Science is pretty neat, am I right?
Sit back and relax in the pristine glow created by this 7.5" H Salt Lamp. A perfect option to mount near your bathtub, Jacuzzi, or bedroom, this table lamp is sure to engulf you in warm and serene ambiance. Made from 100% pure salt, it has a unique shape that looks elegant in most decors. This 7.5" H Salt Lamp has a globally inspired style, and displays a gorgeous orange color that produces a tranquil glow in the room. This table lamp has been scientifically proven to function like an air...
That doesn’t mean the people who have experienced benefits are entirely wrong, though. Kogan told SheKnows it’s possible the lamp provides a placebo effect. Essentially, a person believes the salt lamps will help, there’s a psychological component to their issue, and thus the lamp does relieve some of their symptoms. “It’s more of a mind-body effort, really, because it’s not like there’s some kind of biochemical being released from the lamp,” she said.
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Match the beauty of a natural Himalayan salt lamp with the power of technology with a multicolor USB salt lamp. All of the benefits that you expect from a Himalayan salt crystal lamp are featured, most notably its ability to draw in moisture and purify the toxins that you may have in your environment from the air in a process known as hygroscope. They also have the natural orange-pink glow that has made Himalayan salt crystal lamps famous throughout the world.
The Himalayan pink salt lamp lets off this beautiful pink/orange glow that is reminiscent of a sunset. Just as the blue light is energizing, the slower wavelengths in the warmer colors are relaxing to the mind and easier on the eyes. I think about it like the difference in the natural energy cycle at high noon and at sunset. The salt lamp is great for balancing the extra blue light.
As for the idea that water vapor in the room attracts pollutants, then sticks to the surface of the lamp, that, too, makes little sense, he said. Some pollutants in the air might, by chance, stick to water vapor on the surface of the lukewarm piece of rock salt, but there's no evidence that the meager heat produced by a light bulb could produce significant amounts of pollutant filtering, he said.

A Himalayan salt lamp will clean, deodorize and ionize the air, getting rid of unwanted pollutants and allergens. A salt lamp will help you say goodbye to dust, pollen, pollutants and smoke! Himalayan salt lamps are also known to increase your energy levels, remove negative ions, neutralize electromagnetic radiation, and provoke better sleep habits. The lamps improve mood and concentration, reduce static electricity and provide you with an environmental-friendly glow by a dim light bulb.
Also, your citation of an EPA website is useless. It just links to the EPA’s IAQ site, which isn’t helpful in trying to figure out what you actually were using from the site. I don’t think I’d use WebMD as a source either if you want to appear reputable to the more intelligent people who can spot bullshit. (Not say WebMD doesn’t have valuable info. Kinda like Wikipedia, a lot is useful and valid, but I would never use it as a source.)
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