To accent the natural beauty of the salt crystals, they’ve housed them in a decorative metal vase, perfect for the design-conscious home. Illuminate your room with a warm, pleasant and relaxing amber glow. It's a perfect choice in the center of a coffee table, desk. Great for meditation, yoga spaces, and as a nightlight. Also, you can try it as a bedside lamp.
Salt lamps, which are merely light bulbs of varying wattages placed within blocks of rock salt of varying sizes, have become an increasingly popular product in the alternative medicine scene and are marketed as “natural ionizers.” An ionizer, in theory, produces ions, which are atoms or molecules with a net positive or negative charge caused by an uneven number of protons to electrons.
It’s true! They’re called salt lamps or salt rock lamps, and yes, they’re actually made from pink Himalayan salt and are able to light your surroundings — but they’re really not bought for their moderate lighting abilities. There are major claims that a Himalayan salt lamp does much more than provide you with a pretty glow. Himalayan salt lamp benefits supposedly include decreasing air pollution, negative ions and electrosmog caused by electronic devices in addition to symptom reduction for people suffering from from asthma, allergies and other illnesses.

In January of this year, Michael's issued a recall on some of their salt lamps sold under the Lumière brand. Rest assured, the issue and recall had nothing to do with the Himalayan salt itself but reported hazards with the dimmer switch and plug. If you’re looking to purchase a lamp, talk to the retailer and make sure it has been assembled properly and that the piece you’re interested in was not included in the recall.

I have purchased six of these salt lamps. 2 for me and 4 for friends and relatives. They make a great gift. I have one on in my livingroom during the day and one in my bedroom at night. It may just be in my head but I actually do believe I sleep better. I love the beautiful glow and the dimmer switch is great. It can be very bright, very dim or many degrees of either. It makes a great conversation piece, nd gets lots of compliments.
Well written article on Himalayan Salt lamps. I have these lamps in my house. These lamps are just more than awesome. They are not only beautiful but also have healthy and healing benefits for human mind and body as you have mentioned above. They eliminate all the dust particles and smoke from the air and make it pure and fresh. They help me in relieving stress and depression and improve the sleep cycle. I bought my lamps from ittefaqco at a very reasonable price and they are of great quality. You can visit their website if you want to.
The structure aspect is important, says Beauchamp. One way to get crystals to generate ions is to alter the shape of its crystal structure via temperature, something that can happen if a crystal structure is asymmetric. He points to a crystal called lithium tantalate, which changes its crystal structure when heated up in such a way as to create areas of high and low electrical potential when heated or cooled. This property allows it to generate an electric field that could, in theory, ionize the air around it. Sodium chloride’s chemical structure is a symmetrical cube that does not have the capability to generate high electric fields in the vicinity of a crystal.
And I’m a sucker for lighting. I own various smart LED lights, an artificial dawn simulator, multi color LED strips, special bulbs which are all great to adjust the hue to a certain time of the day (orange hugging bed time), blue-ish when it’s hot weather, another hue during movie time.) but still, none of these lights emits the soothing glow my HPS lamp does.
The amount of negative ions a salt lamp can release depends on its size and how warm the candle or lightbulb can make it. The larger the crystal, obviously, the more expensive the lamp, but the larger area it can provide with negative ions. Salt lamps that produce 'night-light' amounts of light can provide ions to an area equal to the average office cubicle.
 While “radioactive waves” are not—strictly speaking—a thing, what the author is likely talking about is an electromagnetic field generated by household electronics. The issue is that the only problem a salt lamp (via its dubious negative ionizer mechanism) would theoretically solve is a preponderance of positively charged ions in the air which would be in turn neutralized by the negative ions. An electromagnetic field will only generate ions if the voltage is high enough to cause an electric discharge, and the electromagnetic fields generated by household appliances are not that that strong, per the WHO:
When it comes to buying Himalayan pink salt lamps, coverage is determined by the size of the crystal. Smaller lamps (like this 5-8 lbs lamp) are good for the average bedroom, while larger lamps (like this 11-15 lbs lamp) are better for spaces like the living room or den. On average, calculate that 1 lb of Himalayan salt crystal will cleanse the air in approximately a 4′ x 4′ area.

So many things around us nowadays release electromagnetic radiation in the form of unhealthy positive ions — things like your cell phone, computer and television, just to name a few.  This electromagnetic radiation (EM), aka electrosmog, may be invisible but is believed to cause some serious long-term effects. Constant exposure to EM radiation is known primarily to cause fatigue, increase stress and weaken the immune system.
Real Himalayan salt lamps are made of salt so it’s not surprising that they’re fragile objects. A good manufacturer knows this and has return policies that are flexible since there could be some damage in transit. If a salt lamp’s maker is extremely strict (like a “NO RETURNS” policy), then it makes you wonder if it’s a scam operation. This might not necessarily be the case, but some fake retailers have been known not to permit any returns because they know they’re not giving you the real thing.
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