While “radioactive waves” are not—strictly speaking—a thing, what the author is likely talking about is an electromagnetic field generated by household electronics. The issue is that the only problem a salt lamp (via its dubious negative ionizer mechanism) would theoretically solve is a preponderance of positively charged ions in the air which would be in turn neutralized by the negative ions. An electromagnetic field will only generate ions if the voltage is high enough to cause an electric discharge, and the electromagnetic fields generated by household appliances are not that that strong, per the WHO:
Taking a drive through the countryside with the windows down, spending time at the beach or camping in the mountains, or simply taking a shower first thing in the morning are all things that many people find invigorating. It’s not a coincidence that these are all activities which expose us to increased concentrations of negative ions such as those generated by Himalayan salt lamps. The fact is, positive ions sap our bodies of energy. Unfortunately, it’s all too common for us to try to diagnose the problem as something else entirely.

“The lady doth protest too much…” This article suggests to me that the writer or those who have paid to writer has a hidden agenda. And I’ll cite that science has made our world into a shit hole where we are now browbeaten into accepting and trusting conventional gangster snake oil medicine, pesticides, herbicides, fluoride, mercury laced vaccines, etc., and so on, all of which is touted to be good for us but which is poison to us while we are ridiculed and discouraged by science “experts” from using natural solutions. Science and scientists have betrayed us. And why? Because they are funded by those who want to continue to poison us. If the writer of this article is in earnest, then the writer has been thoroughly, successfully indoctrinated into serving on the wrong side of history.


As mentioned earlier, there are many different types of salt lamps that range in color to style. Among the most common are lamps created by inserting a light source directly into a salt crystal or a basket of crystals with a light source underneath. In these cases, the differences are for the most part purely aesthetic, and your choice comes down to finding the right solution for your tastes and complementing the environment in your home.

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Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us. I have Himalayan salt lamps in my house. I personally love them. These lamps are just more than awesome. They are not only beautiful but also have healthy and healing benefits for human mind and body as you have mentioned above. They eliminate all the dust particles and smoke from the air and make it pure and fresh. They help me in relieving stress and depression and improve the sleep cycle. I bought my lamps from ittefaqco at a very reasonable price and they are of great quality. You can visit their website if you want to.
Potential health benefits aside, salt lamps can be an interesting, unique way to decorate your home. The calming pink light can provide an atmosphere different than most table lamps and the pink salt crystal has the potential to match a variety of decor styles. Many people prefer to use salt lamps as an evening light source, to help transition away from the bright lights of the daytime and relax before bed.
However, there is no evidence that these lamps produce meaningful amounts of negatively charged particles, or ions, or that they reduce pollutants in the air. To assess the health claims, scientists need to answer three basic questions: Does Himalayan salt contain any special ingredients that could somehow positively affect health? Do negative ions benefit health? And if they do benefit health, do these lamps produce them in any quantity? Malin said. On all three counts, there is little-to-no evidence supporting the claims, he said.
While not a “health benefit” at first glance, static is pesky stuff. It causes stress, embarrassment, and frustration. Static zaps you when you least expect it, as you’re reaching for a door handle, kissing your husband or wife before bed, or trying to pet your dog or cat. Static can give you a bad hair day, make it impossible to clean crumbs or coffee grounds off of the kitchen counter, and even cause you to accidentally go to work with a sock stuck to the back of your shirt…
FDA Compliance: The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition.
The strongest evidence supporting any benefit of negative ions is as an antibacterial agent. A 1979 study in the journal Nature showed that high levels of negative oxygen ions could kill bacteria. Ionizers could also reduce the prevalence of surface and airborne bacteria in refrigerators, according to a 2009 study. However, that research applied only to sanitizing food or work surfaces, and did not make any claims about health benefits.
All the claims described above rely on the singularly false assertion that a block of salt with a light bulb inserted inside will naturally emit negative ions. That argument, when intelligible, usually invokes some sort of interplay between the salt, which attracts water from the air, and the heat from the light evaporating that water, as described in a non-peer-reviewed 2010 paper in the Pakistan Journal of Molecular Biology:
First of all, salts are compounds which are made from combinations of elements that form ionic bonds. Ionic bonds are chemical bonds where the valence electron(s) which participate in bonding are not shared equally by the two atoms. Ionic compounds form in nature with a nearly perfect balance of charge so that there are just as many positive ions as negative ions in the compound. Because of this if a big block of salt were to release lots of negative ions into the air it would develop a net positive charge which would not allow more negative ions to be released. One way that negative ions could be released is if the block of salt released both negative and positive ions into the air in equal proportions. This, however, would have just as much of a negative effect, from the positive, “free radical” ions, as a positive effect from the negative ions.

It’s true! They’re called salt lamps or salt rock lamps, and yes, they’re actually made from pink Himalayan salt and are able to light your surroundings — but they’re really not bought for their moderate lighting abilities. There are major claims that a Himalayan salt lamp does much more than provide you with a pretty glow. Himalayan salt lamp benefits supposedly include decreasing air pollution, negative ions and electrosmog caused by electronic devices in addition to symptom reduction for people suffering from from asthma, allergies and other illnesses.
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Does a foot detox work? What the research says Some people believe that a foot detox can remove toxins from the body and leave people feeling refreshed. While foot detox machines are available, people can also make their own footbaths at home. These footbaths can help remove dirt and dead skin, as well as aiding relaxation. Learn more about foot detoxes here. Read now

There have been more than 2,000 studies exposing the toxic effects of electromagnetic fields from all sources. Scientists have come to the scary conclusion that “chronic exposure to even low-level radiation (like that from cell phones) can cause a variety of cancers, impair immunity, and contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, heart disease, and many other ailments.” (3)


FDA Compliance: The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition.
However, there is no evidence that these lamps produce meaningful amounts of negatively charged particles, or ions, or that they reduce pollutants in the air. To assess the health claims, scientists need to answer three basic questions: Does Himalayan salt contain any special ingredients that could somehow positively affect health? Do negative ions benefit health? And if they do benefit health, do these lamps produce them in any quantity? Malin said. On all three counts, there is little-to-no evidence supporting the claims, he said.
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