As discussed above, “boundless amounts” of negative ions would be a bit of a stretch, given the total and complete lack of any ions generated by our lamp. Ignoring that fact, however, brings us to the claim that positive ions make us feel bad and negative ions make us feel great. In terms of effects on mood, there is some research that suggests that negative ions can play a role in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder. A 1998 study in JAMA psychiatry found, for example, that:
Since positive ions are often created by electronic devices like computers, TVs, microwaves, and even vacuum cleaners, they can often exacerbate problems like allergies, stress and sleep trouble. Negative ions can neutralize positive ions (they bond together) and help cleanse the air. Additionally, salt lamps offer a soothing glow that many people find relaxing.

They can definitely clean the surrounding air of allergens and, even though it’s difficult to find extensive scientific studies to back all of the reported health benefits of salt lamps, the many positive reviews of people’s personal experiences makes them well worth considering, either for your own home, or as a gift for a friend who cares about health and wellness.

The structure aspect is important, says Beauchamp. One way to get crystals to generate ions is to alter the shape of its crystal structure via temperature, something that can happen if a crystal structure is asymmetric. He points to a crystal called lithium tantalate, which changes its crystal structure when heated up in such a way as to create areas of high and low electrical potential when heated or cooled. This property allows it to generate an electric field that could, in theory, ionize the air around it. Sodium chloride’s chemical structure is a symmetrical cube that does not have the capability to generate high electric fields in the vicinity of a crystal.
Positive ions are created by electronic devices and have been dubbed ‘electronic smog’ or ‘electronic air pollution’. As we all know, we are increasingly surrounded by all sorts of computers, large screen TVs, telephones, microwaves and other appliances we now deem necessary for our survival and entertainment (although only a decade ago we did perfectly well without most of these).
This wonderful accent light features a crystal salt block that comes from a mine at the foot of the Himalayas. Placed over a light source, the stone shines with a warm and inviting glow. It makes a perfect room accent in home theater settings, or add visual interest to side tables and display shelves. The stone sits in a hardwood base. The shape of stone may vary slightly. Salt Crystal is a Natural Air Purifier. The Himalayan Natural Crystal Salt Lamp also works as an air purifier. When lit...

This explanation has the great benefit of sounding scientific. Who really knows how ions are formed in the first place or what will happen to blocks of heated salt rock, anyway? One person with pretty deep knowledge on the topic is Caltech professor of chemistry Jack Beauchamp, an expert in (among other things) the myriad processes that generate ions and the analytical methods used to detect those ions.
Real Himalayan salt lamps are made of salt so it’s not surprising that they’re fragile objects. A good manufacturer knows this and has return policies that are flexible since there could be some damage in transit. If a salt lamp’s maker is extremely strict (like a “NO RETURNS” policy), then it makes you wonder if it’s a scam operation. This might not necessarily be the case, but some fake retailers have been known not to permit any returns because they know they’re not giving you the real thing.
The Himalayan pink salt lamp lets off this beautiful pink/orange glow that is reminiscent of a sunset. Just as the blue light is energizing, the slower wavelengths in the warmer colors are relaxing to the mind and easier on the eyes. I think about it like the difference in the natural energy cycle at high noon and at sunset. The salt lamp is great for balancing the extra blue light.
Scientists have studied the psychological and biological effects of positive and negative ions in the air for over 80 years. However, there seems to be no consensus as to whether these ions can actually influence a person’s physical and mental health. Currently, there is no consistent data to support the effects of air ions (either positive or negative) on sleep, relaxation, anxiety or mood (Perez, et. al, 2013).
Since we are constantly surrounded by modern day WIFI, CELL phone towers, Tv’s and other electrical appliances, these things give off a lot of Electro magnetic Radiation or EMFS for short. These EMF’s high in positive ions have been known to reduce our serotonin levels and can cause cancer, fatigue, lathery and a host of problems we face today. Salt lamps, since they have the ability to generate negative ions, neutralize these EMF’s .

At first I was a bit concerned after reading reviews about the dimmer switch (basically a variable resistor) heating up, melting, and causing a fire. My kid bought this Himalayan Pink Salt Lamp for my wife as a Christmas gift because she has been wanting one for a long time. I read up on the fire hazard and noticed that a recall has been placed on this salt lamp. All of the one star rated "fire warning" reviews are from many months or years ago. So I assume that the batch that was sent out has had this dimmer issue fixed. Basically a higher wattage variable resistor is needed to fix this problem.
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