That doesn’t mean the lamps are totally harmless. The retailer Michaels had to recall several due to shock and fire hazards in January 2017, and Kogan says it’s possible the lamp could pose problems for people who are already struggling with lung issues. “Some people with interstitial lung disease, such as pulmonary fibrosis for example, or cystic fibrosis, they may be sensitive to the salt particles themselves,” Kogan acknowledged.
We at originsalt have so many satisfied customers who say that this lamp has changed their life, so we definitely believe that there is more than what we know behind them. Every day people write on our wall how the Himalayan Salt Lamp has helped them for their allergy, asthma, sinus problems, sleep problems and so on. Even if you think that this lamp is not working, it is still a better solution than an ordinary lamp. The light from a real Himalayan Salt Lamp is really calming and relaxing and you can adjust the light, which is also great. So my suggestion for you would be to test and see by yourself, may be this is what you need.

[…] While some dispute the health claims of this type of salt, saying the mineral content is too small to make any sort of recognizable difference, many others use Himalayan salt as a healthy addition to their diet. Some people even enjoy the soft glow of a Himalayan salt lamp in their house as it is said to reduce positive ions in the home environment, improving health and well-being. […]
I used this lamp as instructed, leaving on a few hours per day. Today I came home after the lamp had been completely off and it had turned on on its own (despite switch still being turned to off) and the lamp was leaking liquid onto the table. The dimmer switch was very hot to the touch. The lamp could not be turned off without unplugging it. I only had this lamp a couple of weeks.
They’re a popular way to decorate for the crunchiest among us (full disclosure: I have two) and depending on the size can run anywhere from $15 to hundreds. While there’s no question the lamps have a beautiful, natural feel to them, many people are suggesting they’re more than something pretty to look at. Most of the claims revolve around the idea that the lamp emits negative ions, which they claim can boost mood, purify the air and reduce asthma triggers.
These lamps are believed to help with indoor air pollution among other health benefits. As indoor air experts, we decided to take a closer look. Is it possible that Himalayan pink salt lamps can help provide these types of benefits and to what extent? Is there scientific evidence to back up the lofty manufacturer and consumer claims? Learn more about the buzz surrounding salt lamps so that you can decide for yourself whether they live up to the hype.
We have a lot of experience with observing ions. What we did with the lamp, since it’s supposed to make negative ions, was to place it adjacent to the inlet and, just by itself, we observed no ions at all. We turned it on and looked for negative ions. We looked for positive ions. We waited for the lamp to heat up. The bulb inside eventually does heat the rock salt, but we didn’t see anything.

Thanks for sharing such detailed information about salt lamps. These lamps are really very good. I have them in my home and office and I just love them. They actually clean the air and make it fresh and pure. Their soft glow make the atmosphere so calm and peaceful. I have them in different shapes. I cannot imagine my home without them. You can visit the given website of ittefaq.co to know more about different shapes and sizes of these amazing lamps.
I think people should just try them for their selves and make up their own minds. I know a someone that has been a teacher for 30 plus years and she swears by them. She has used these salt lights in her class room for the past 5yrs and like she said it’s just her opinion but her class rooms have been a lot calmer since she’s been using them. SHE has even gone as dark as to have themy off for months just to see if they were truly working. Oh ya she is a elementary teacher.
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.
In 1966, a hospital in Jerusalem conducted a study of thirty-eight infants suffering from respiratory problems. They cared for half of the infants in a ward without any ion change, and cared for the other half in a ward where a negative-ion generator was in use. “The researchers reported that neg-ions without any other treatment “ that is, no drugs “ seemed to cure attacks of asthma and bronchitis more quickly than drugs, antibiotics included… children treated with neg-ions were less prone to ‘rebound attacks’ (relapses)… the scientific report said that the tests ‘demonstrated that atmospheric ions have an effect on infants, especially those suffering from asthmatic bronchitis. Less scientifically, they found that the babies didn’t cry as often and as loudly as they did in normal air.” The Ion Effect, by Fred Soyka, p. 57, 1991.
These studies, however, used high concentrations of negative ions generated by industrial scale ion generators. Seeing as we have uncovered no evidence to support the claim a salt lamp produces any ions, the notion that a $29.99 block of rock with a light bulb could rival the power of a specifically designed laboratory equipment seems dubious. Much of the pseudoscience written about the positive effects of negative ions similarly disregards scale in their analyses, equating negative ionization at any level as the same phenomenon.
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 While “radioactive waves” are not—strictly speaking—a thing, what the author is likely talking about is an electromagnetic field generated by household electronics. The issue is that the only problem a salt lamp (via its dubious negative ionizer mechanism) would theoretically solve is a preponderance of positively charged ions in the air which would be in turn neutralized by the negative ions. An electromagnetic field will only generate ions if the voltage is high enough to cause an electric discharge, and the electromagnetic fields generated by household appliances are not that that strong, per the WHO:
I have purchased six of these salt lamps. 2 for me and 4 for friends and relatives. They make a great gift. I have one on in my livingroom during the day and one in my bedroom at night. It may just be in my head but I actually do believe I sleep better. I love the beautiful glow and the dimmer switch is great. It can be very bright, very dim or many degrees of either. It makes a great conversation piece, nd gets lots of compliments.
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