Negative ions occur more often in nature and they are often created by things like lightening storms, sunlight, waterfalls, and ocean waves. Running water is considered nature’s greatest source of negative ions and may be one of the things that contributes to the refreshing scent of waterfalls and the beach. In fact, this is one of the reasons people often report feeling renewed or refreshed after a storm or after spending time at the beach.


The Himalayan salt lamps can release negative ions into the air, creating an effect similar to an ionizer, purifying the surrounding air. This process is enhanced by the natural process of NACL resulting in the production of negative ions which eliminate the positive ions which are present in our environment, produced by computers, refrigerators, televisions and more. Thus, these lamps make the air clean, fresh and healthy to live in. HIMALAYAN GLOW Himalayan Salt Lamp is minded, hand carved...
These lamps are believed to help with indoor air pollution among other health benefits. As indoor air experts, we decided to take a closer look. Is it possible that Himalayan pink salt lamps can help provide these types of benefits and to what extent? Is there scientific evidence to back up the lofty manufacturer and consumer claims? Learn more about the buzz surrounding salt lamps so that you can decide for yourself whether they live up to the hype.
Ideally, you should place a lamp prominently in each room to feel the maximum benefit. Bedrooms and living areas are the best place to start as these are where you will spend the most time. Make sure that any lamp you choose is a genuine Himalayan Salt Lamp and not a cheap fake alternative as lamps made from rock salt will not produce the same health benefits.
We have a lot of experience with observing ions. What we did with the lamp, since it’s supposed to make negative ions, was to place it adjacent to the inlet and, just by itself, we observed no ions at all. We turned it on and looked for negative ions. We looked for positive ions. We waited for the lamp to heat up. The bulb inside eventually does heat the rock salt, but we didn’t see anything.
So yes, they’re beautiful, and you’re totally welcome to get one for that purpose. It’s just unlikely to provide any measurable medical benefits. But if you want one to add to your meditation routine or because it fits with your decor, go for it. “It’s a nice new-age prop to have,” Kogan says. “But also we have to be smart and not fall prey to marketing claims.”
There have been more than 2,000 studies exposing the toxic effects of electromagnetic fields from all sources. Scientists have come to the scary conclusion that “chronic exposure to even low-level radiation (like that from cell phones) can cause a variety of cancers, impair immunity, and contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, heart disease, and many other ailments.” (3)
Himalayan salt lamps are believed to filter dust, mold, mildew and pet dander from indoor air. Just as a nasal saline spray uses salt to clear airways, they help to relieve allergy symptoms of all kinds. Those who struggle with asthma also claim to benefit from Himalayan salt. It is such an effective breathing aid that certain manufacturers have produced Himalayan salt inhalers targeted toward sufferers of asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory issues. 
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So yes, they’re beautiful, and you’re totally welcome to get one for that purpose. It’s just unlikely to provide any measurable medical benefits. But if you want one to add to your meditation routine or because it fits with your decor, go for it. “It’s a nice new-age prop to have,” Kogan says. “But also we have to be smart and not fall prey to marketing claims.”
 While “radioactive waves” are not—strictly speaking—a thing, what the author is likely talking about is an electromagnetic field generated by household electronics. The issue is that the only problem a salt lamp (via its dubious negative ionizer mechanism) would theoretically solve is a preponderance of positively charged ions in the air which would be in turn neutralized by the negative ions. An electromagnetic field will only generate ions if the voltage is high enough to cause an electric discharge, and the electromagnetic fields generated by household appliances are not that that strong, per the WHO:
We have a lot of experience with observing ions. What we did with the lamp, since it’s supposed to make negative ions, was to place it adjacent to the inlet and, just by itself, we observed no ions at all. We turned it on and looked for negative ions. We looked for positive ions. We waited for the lamp to heat up. The bulb inside eventually does heat the rock salt, but we didn’t see anything.
I used this lamp as instructed, leaving on a few hours per day. Today I came home after the lamp had been completely off and it had turned on on its own (despite switch still being turned to off) and the lamp was leaking liquid onto the table. The dimmer switch was very hot to the touch. The lamp could not be turned off without unplugging it. I only had this lamp a couple of weeks.
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