However, there is no evidence that these lamps produce meaningful amounts of negatively charged particles, or ions, or that they reduce pollutants in the air. To assess the health claims, scientists need to answer three basic questions: Does Himalayan salt contain any special ingredients that could somehow positively affect health? Do negative ions benefit health? And if they do benefit health, do these lamps produce them in any quantity? Malin said. On all three counts, there is little-to-no evidence supporting the claims, he said.
Since positive ions are often created by electronic devices like computers, TVs, microwaves, and even vacuum cleaners, they can often exacerbate problems like allergies, stress and sleep trouble. Negative ions can neutralize positive ions (they bond together) and help cleanse the air. Additionally, salt lamps offer a soothing glow that many people find relaxing.

These soothing lamps may also help boost mood and energy levels, especially for those with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). The soft orange hues are one of the soothing colors often used to calm mood and increase focus. The small amounts of negative ions may also be helpful in boosting mood as well. But, if you’re looking for the benefits of the negative ions, spend some time outside instead!

The positive results seen in negative ionization studies may be caused by the placebo effect; the few studies showing benefits don't show a clear relationship between perceived benefits and ion concentration, Malin said. "You could have 300 [ions] per cubic centimeter or 1 million per cubic centimeter and people would say, 'Yep, I'm feeling better,'" Malin said.


Due to the hygroscopic (water-absorbing) and photoelectric nature of a heated Himalayan salt lamp, it emits vapor and negative ions, respectively. The negative ions were proven to attract pollutants, airborne particles, and positive ions generated by electromagnetic fields (EMF) emanating from electric devices to the salt lamp, purifying the air and creating a feel-good atmosphere. Exposure to such field were found to go as far as complicate already-existing diseases.

Sit back and relax in the glow created by the Himalayan Salt Lamp, a perfect option to mount near your bathtub, Jacuzzi, or bedroom. Made from 100% pure salt, it has a unique shape. The Himalayan Salt Lamp has a globally inspired style, and displays an orange color that produces a tranquil glow in the room. The salt comes from a 250 million year old dried up sea bed. Many believe these lamps can make the air clean, fresh and healthy to live in by releasing negative ions into the air, creating...
These soothing lamps may also help boost mood and energy levels, especially for those with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). The soft orange hues are one of the soothing colors often used to calm mood and increase focus. The small amounts of negative ions may also be helpful in boosting mood as well. But, if you’re looking for the benefits of the negative ions, spend some time outside instead!
We have a lot of experience with observing ions. What we did with the lamp, since it’s supposed to make negative ions, was to place it adjacent to the inlet and, just by itself, we observed no ions at all. We turned it on and looked for negative ions. We looked for positive ions. We waited for the lamp to heat up. The bulb inside eventually does heat the rock salt, but we didn’t see anything.
I bought a salt lamp recently from Salzburg, Austria and kept it on a table. But I seldom turn the lamp on. It is on the bottom of the table where I kept my laptop. I went on vacation for 10 days, and when I got back home, I saw water around the lamp and that water has corroded my laptop. Is this water acidic by nature? How can I stop water from the lamp? I need advice urgently.
Also, your citation of an EPA website is useless. It just links to the EPA’s IAQ site, which isn’t helpful in trying to figure out what you actually were using from the site. I don’t think I’d use WebMD as a source either if you want to appear reputable to the more intelligent people who can spot bullshit. (Not say WebMD doesn’t have valuable info. Kinda like Wikipedia, a lot is useful and valid, but I would never use it as a source.)
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.
Due to the hygroscopic (water-absorbing) and photoelectric nature of a heated Himalayan salt lamp, it emits vapor and negative ions, respectively. The negative ions were proven to attract pollutants, airborne particles, and positive ions generated by electromagnetic fields (EMF) emanating from electric devices to the salt lamp, purifying the air and creating a feel-good atmosphere. Exposure to such field were found to go as far as complicate already-existing diseases.
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